Thursday, May 15, 2014

School IPM 2015 Newsletter: May 2014


School IPM 2015: Reducing Pest Problems and Pesticide Hazards in Our Nation's Schools
School IPM 2015 Newsletter: May 2014
In This Issue
What's New?
Highlights
Upcoming Events
SHIELDS IAQ Master Class Project
Earwigs Thrive in Wet Springs
Wisconsin EPA Grant Complete
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What's New This Month 


In May 2014, the International School Grounds Alliance is calling on schools around the globe to take pupils outside to celebrate their grounds. It's as simple as that. They believe school grounds are very important to children and shape their experience of the world around them. If you agree, take some time during this month-an hour, a day, even a week or several different times during the month-to go outside into your grounds with your students.

Learn more and how your schools can participate.



Highlights 
Celebrate STEM Innovation! The first  STEM summit for Elementary Education!
 
 Come be inspired-learn how STEM is moving humanity forward. Hear about cutting edge innovations! Don't miss this opportunity on Wednesday June 4, 2014 to hear major innovators speak about their personal path to STEM. In addition to learning about Massachusetts' culture of STEM innovation, there will be breakout sessions focused on elementary STEM resources, STEM grant identification, and how to write a successful STEM grant. Teachers, administrators, STEM Industry, and policymakers are all invited to join this celebration. Participation is FREE and paid for the by the US Department of Education's Race to the Top Fund.
 



Upcoming Events

May 18-21, 2014
National Conference on Urban Entomology  
San Antonio, TX   

 June 4, 2014  
STEM² Summit
Wenham, MA
 
 June 12, 2014  
Ohio Healthy Schools Training
   Columbus, OH

June 13, 2014
 Indiana Healthy Schools Training  Indianapolis, IN

August 24-27, 2014
Association of Structural Pest Control Regulatory Officials (ASPCRO) National Meeting   
Missoula, MT 
October, 2014
Empowering School Integrated Pest Management
Orlando, FL
More Information 

November 16-19, 2014
Entomological Society of America (ESA) National Meeting  
Portland, OR 
March 24-26, 2015
8th International IPM Symposium  
Salt Lake City, UT   


Quick Links
*View this newsletter as a  PDF
Greetings from School IPM 2015!  
Every day, 49 million children attend school in the United States, served by nearly seven million teachers and staff.   But they're not alone.  Schools are also frequented by a number of pests including cockroaches, mice, dust mites and more.  Asthma is epidemic among children, impacting nearly 6% of school children nationally with rates as high as 25% in urban centers.  House mice and cockroaches are potent asthma triggers.

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a prevention-based, highly effective approach proven to reduce pest complaints and pesticide use by up to 90% in schools and other public buildings.  IPM practices such as sanitation and exclusion also improve food safety, fire safety and energy conservation.  Our newsletter highlights real-life examples of IPM in practice and can help you start an IPM program in your school district.  For more information, visit www.schoolipm2015.com

SHIELDS IAQ Master Class Project   
School Health and Indoor Environments Leadership Development, known as SHIELDS, was designed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and a host of national Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) leaders, to connect stewards of school environmental health and IAQ to achieve one goal, creating holistic, healthy school environments nationwide. SHIELDS participants include a variety of diverse school stakeholders.   

SHIELDS Network members nominated school districts at the 2013 SHIELDS Summit to participate in the pilot SHIELDS IAQ Master Class being launched this year. The purpose of the project is to improve district staff ability to implement an IAQ management program.

Tracy Enger, program analyst at EPA and EPA representative on the Master Class Project reports, "The SHIELDS IAQ Master Class is a unique and supportive learning community for people who are serious about taking action to make their school indoor environments healthier, cleaner, safer places that improve learning and teaching outcomes."

Districts were chosen based on their efforts to help school staff acquire the skills, tools and knowledge that lead to an exemplary IAQ school management program. Nominated districts will be invited to participate in a needs assessment. Based on results, Master Class members will be selected. Future members will be invited to join based on their readiness and interest.

Each member will commit to an individual learning and action plan including accessing various SHIELDS Network educational resources, such as online tutorials and webinars, face-to-face engagements, regional summits and mentoring relationships. Members will acquire knowledge based on a proven IAQ management framework, including the following core topics:  

-       Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
-        Moisture and Mold Control
-        Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
-        Cleaning
-        Maintenance
-        Materials Selection
-        Source Control
-        Asthma Management

Participating will receive certificates for both completing trainings and taking actions to improve IAQ. This project offers a unique opportunity to educate and recognize individuals who go above and beyond to ensure IAQ is a valued part of school indoor environmental health.

The SHIELDS IAQ Master Class will evolve as input is received from potential nominees and members. To learn more about the SHIELDS IAQ Master Class contact Tracy Enger.

Earwigs Thrive in Wet Springs
Earwigs are most abundant during unusually wet springs and summers. Contrary to legend, they don't actually tunnel into human brains through the ear canal. In reality, earwigs are not considered a major pest, and are beneficial in many environments, though they can be a nuisance inside homes.

Identification
University of
Nebraska-Lincoln
Adult earwigs are pale brown to reddish black in color, with flat bodies that are ¼ to one-inch long. Both males and females have large pincers at the end of their abdomens for defense against predators and to capture prey. Earwigs do not generally attack humans, but will bite if trapped, in clothing or sat upon for example. They seldom fly despite most species having wings under short, hard wing covers.

Damage
Earwigs feed on a variety of dead and living organisms, including insects, mites and growing shoots of plants. They can do substantial damage to seedling plants by removing parts of their leaves or stems. Earwigs may also feed on soft fruit such as strawberries or blackberries. Earwigs are encouraged in many crops where they help control plant-feeding mites, aphids and other pests.

They seek refuge indoors when conditions outside are too wet, dry, hot or cold. They do not breed indoors because eggs and nymphs cannot endure long periods of dryness. Earwigs pose no health hazards.

Management
An IPM approach includes limiting favorable habitats. Keep water away from buildings by installing and maintaining gutter downspouts to make sure water drains away from structures. Ventilate crawl spaces to deter these moisture-loving insects. A mulch of compost around seedlings can provide earwigs with more preferred organisms to eat, diverting attention away from seedlings. Deny access to buildings by caulking cracks and crevices, screening and weather stripping doors and cutting back foliage that touches buildings.

To learn more about earwigs, visit the

Wisconsin EPA Grant Complete   
Twelve Cooperative Educational Service Agencies (CESAs) provide services to public school districts throughout Wisconsin including information technology, special education and instructional technology. These not-for-profit organizations are very effective in providing services, including to districts whose smaller size makes outsourcing these services a necessity. In 2012 CESA 10 received a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grant to raise IPM awareness and facilitate its implementation in Wisconsin public schools.

Under the two-year grant, CESA 10 implemented IPM in 13 pilot schools and worked to educate additional districts about IPM. Pilot schools were required to report key metrics for CESA 10 to review including absenteeism, training records and participation in implementing verifiable IPM. CESA 10 also offered compliance reviews, employee training and support materials. Additionally, many schools needed help with recordkeeping and ensuring only licensed applicators make or supervise all pesticide applications on school grounds, a state requirement.

The EPA grant came to a close last month. The final grant report will be available later this month. The IPM Institute will conduct an analysis on project outcomes, funded by the North Central IPM Center. We will review the CESA model and develop strengths, weakness, opportunities and challenges, with a goal of learning where and how this approach can best be used in Wisconsin and other states.

For more information on CESA 10's Environmental Health and Safety Services, visit www.cesa10.k12.wi.us/fm.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

International School Grounds Month - May 2014


In May 2014, the International School Grounds Alliance is calling on schools around the globe to take their pupils outside to celebrate their grounds. It's as simple as that. We believe school grounds are very important to children and shape their experience of the world around them. If you agree with us, we hope you will take some time during this month-an hour, a day, even a week or several different times during the month-to go outside into your grounds with your students.
 
Learn more and how your schools can participate
l Grounds Month - May 2014

STEM2 Summit: Celebrate STEM Innovation

STEM² Summit: Celebrate STEM Innovation!


 
Celebrate STEM Innovation! The first  STEM summit for Elementary Education!

Come be inspired-learn how STEM is moving humanity forward. Hear about cutting edge innovations developed - all right here in Massachusetts! Don't miss this opportunity to hear major innovators speak about their personal path to STEM. You might be surprised to hear their passion for STEM began early on in elementary school and how their resulting contributions changed society. In addition to learning about Massachusetts' culture of STEM innovation, we'll be holding breakout sessions focused on elementary STEM resources, STEM grant identification, and how to write a successful STEM grant. Teachers, administrators, STEM Industry, and policymakers are all invited to join this celebration. Participation is FREE and paid for the by the US Department of Education's Race to the Top Fund.

Celebrate STEM Innovation! The first STEM summit bringing together innovators and educators. .Come be inspired-learn how STEM is moving humanity forward. Hear about cutting edge innovations developed - all right here in Massachusetts! Don't miss this opportunity to hear major innovators speak about their personal path to STEM. You might be surprised


When: 
Wednesday June 4, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 2:30 PM EDT

Where:
Gordon College
255 Grapevine Road
Wenham, MA 01984
Driving Directions

Excellence in Energy and Environmental Affairs Awards

 Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Rick Sullivan honored 27 energy and environmental education programs at the 20th Annual Secretary's Awards for Excellence in Energy and Environmental Education held on May 6, 2014!



Special thank you to Robin Organ for being the emcee and Meg Colclough for coordinating everything!

The energy at the State House today was really amazing. Feel free to pass on the link to your networks in celebration of the tremendous energy & environmental education happening in MA!


Will your student be graduating from National Green Schools Society?

Will your students be graduating from National Green Schools Society? We've extended the deadline. 


 
We would like your environmentally engaged 2014 GRADUATES to apply for special recognition from National Green Schools Society this year. If graduates have performed 100 hours of environment service they are eligible to apply for an honor stole and certificate from NGSS. Complete an applicationtracking form, and letter of intent (a 1-2 page essay outlining accomplishments). Send in your $35 fee by May 16th to Green Schools, PO Box 323, Mansfield, MA 02048. Send completed documents to Maureen Aylward, Director of Students and Schools, maureen.aylward@projectgreenschools.org

National Green Schools Society honors and develops bright, civic-minded, environmentally literate citizens in your schools and communities. Students in grades 5-8 and 9-12 develop their passion for preserving the environment, while improving schools and communities through environmental service, leadership, and activism.

Created and developed by the multi-award winning non-profit organization, Green Schools, Inc., National Green School Society provides a structure for student engagement in environmental projects as well as recognition for the work they do in your schools and communities.

Green Difference Awards Winners & Green Schools Student Ambassadors of 2014!

Congratulations Green Difference Awards Winners & Green Schools Student Ambassadors of 2014!
    


Please join us for a special ceremony at The MA State House honoring you and others who have made The Green Difference this past year.


  
See note below.  Must RSVP in order to attend as this is a closed event.
  
Please RSVP to GDA2014 @ 
info@projectgreenschools.org with the Names and Number of Attendees from your group by May 14th.

  
IF YOU ARE NOT THE ACTUAL AWARD RECIPIENT, PLEASE HELP GREEN SCHOOLS BY CONTACTING THE AWARD RECIPIENTS YOU NOMINATED.  GREEN SCHOOLS WILL DO THE SAME.

  
Where: MA State House, Grand Staircase

When: May 28th, 11:00-1:00

2014 Green Difference Award Winners are:

1.     Outstanding Commitment to Environmental Education

**Gina McCarthy, U.S. EPA
  • Phyllis Therman, Wellesley Green Schools, MA
  • Janice McPhillips, Hingham High School, MA
2. Outstanding Commitment to Greenovation [GREEN + STEM + Innovation]

**Andrea Falken, U.S. ED
**Governor Deval Patrick, MA
  • Foxborough Regional Charter School, Diploma, MA
  • Manchester Essex Regional High School, Hydroponics, MA
  • Plainville Public Schools, MA
3. Outstanding Green Educator/Program Director...Separate Educators from Programs?

**Stephen Ritz, Green Bronx Machine, NY
  • John Griffith, Conservation Corp, CA
  • Jim Johnson, Science Teacher, Children's Center for Treatment and Education, Beacon Light, PA
  • Laurie Bianchi, Whitman Hanson High School, MA
  • Sung Hwa Chang, Everett, MA
  • Karen Wood, OW Homes Elementary School, MA
  • Sandra Willmore, New Albany-Plain Local Schools, OH
  • Andrew Cassilly, Harford Public School, MD
4. Outstanding Green Superintendent
  • Dr. Mark Logan-Foxborough Regional Charter School, MA
5.  Outstanding Green Principal
  • Elaine Metropolis-Captain Samuel Brown Elementary School, MA
6.     Outstanding School-led Project in Climate Resiliency
  • Young Women In Climate, Manchester Essex Regional High School, MA
7.     Outstanding School-led Project in Energy
  • Broward County Public Schools, FL
8.     Outstanding School-led Project in Conservation
  • Maddie, Manchester Essex Regional High School, MA
  • Lincoln Sudbury Green Team, MA
  • Munford Schools-Teach Up, AL
9.       Outstanding School-based Outdoor Classroom Design + Implementation
  • Mullen Hall, Falmouth, MA
10.  Outstanding Green Student [Elementary/Middle/High]
  • Sarah & Isabella-Green Schools Executive Team, Manchester Essex Regional High School, MA
  • Clara, Lincoln Sudbury, MA
  • Erica Mazzerrelli, Project Green Ball, MA
  • Carter & Olivia, OMG Team, GA
  • Valeriy Golina, Foxborough Regional Charter School, MA
  • Garden Project...Tri County Regional School District, MA
  • Garden Club, Captain Samuel Brown Elementary School, MA

**Recognition Certificates: Environmental Eagles of Captain Samuel Brown Elementary School, MA


The 2014 Green Difference Awards are Sponsored by:
         

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

School IPM 2015 Newsletter: April 2014

School IPM 2015: Reducing Pest Problems and Pesticide Hazards in Our Nation's Schools
School IPM 2015 Newsletter: April 2014
In This Issue
What's New?
Highlights
Upcoming Events
Look Out for Questing Ticks
School IPM 2015 Updated Priorities
Best Management Practices for School IPM
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Receiving a forwarded copy?  Know of others who should receive this newsletter?
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Join the Schoolbugs listserv to ask questions, learn from others and share successes and challenges.
 

What's New This Month 

The Washington School IPM Program   
New resources available on the  Washington School IPM website! 

PEST2014 - A pesticide recordkeeping database for Washington public schools and licensed daycare centers.  This is an updated version of PEST2000.  New features of the database include the ability to input tank mixes on one record and the inclusion of application sites to the annual summary report.

A Classroom InPESTigation - A life science curriculum for grades 3 to 5. The curriculum is designed to promote students' use of science skills to gather knowledge about and address the real-world problem of pests.  The Next Generation Science Standards were used to guide its construction, and activities were crafted to promote learning through social, creative, and thoughtful problem solving.

PNW Pest Press Mosquitoes - Learn about mosquitoes and what you can do to help keep these blood-thirsty pests away from your school.



Highlights
May is Asthma Awareness Month!
Asthma Awareness Month (AAM) is right around the corner! How will you raise asthma awareness and action in your school community?

Plan educational events and activities for students, staff and parents using EPA's Asthma Awareness Month Event Planning Kit. Then check out how to effectively engage local media and broaden your school's reach through social media.

Share your activities with the AsthmaCommunityNetwork.org community by posting to the Events Calendar, Blog and Discussion Forum!
 

Celebrate #AsthmaAwarenessMonth in Your School and Beyond

Social media is a quick and effective way to reach your target audiences and expand your marketing efforts. Facebook reaches more than 1 billion active users monthly, and there are more than 200 million active Twitter users.

Consider using social media, like Facebook and Twitter, to promote AAM and events at your school and in your community. Use the sample posts below on your program's social media pages.
 


Upcoming Events

May 18-21, 2014
National Conference on Urban Entomology  
San Antonio, TX   

August 24-27, 2014
Association of Structural Pest Control Regulatory Officials (ASPCRO) National Meeting   
Missoula, MT 
 More Information

November 16-19, 2014
Entomological Society of America (ESA) National Meting  
Portland, OR 
  More Information

March 24-26, 2015
8th International IPM Symposium  
Salt Lake City, UT   
 More Information


Quick Links
*View this newsletter as a  PDF
Greetings from School IPM 2015!  
Every day, 49 million children attend school in the United States, served by nearly seven million teachers and staff.   But they're not alone.  Schools are also frequented by a number of pests including cockroaches, mice, dust mites and more.  Asthma is epidemic among children, impacting nearly 6% of school children nationally with rates as high as 25% in urban centers.  House mice and cockroaches are potent asthma triggers.

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a prevention-based, highly effective approach proven to reduce pest complaints and pesticide use by up to 90% in schools and other public buildings.  IPM practices such as sanitation and exclusion also improve food safety, fire safety and energy conservation.  Our newsletter highlights real-life examples of IPM in practice and can help you start an IPM program in your school district.  For more information, visit www.schoolipm2015.com

Look Out for Questing Ticks   
Depending on where you are located, hungry ticks follow an annual cycle, seeking wildlife, pet and human hosts as daytime temperatures rise in late winter and spring. Ticks feed on the blood of their hosts, sometimes transferring pathogens including Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, which can have potential lifelong and/or fatal consequences.

How do these non-flying arachnids locate hosts? They stand absolutely still with their first pair of legs outstretched waiting for passers-by, a behavior called questing. In temperate areas east of the Mississippi, dog ticks (Dermacentor variabillis) typically begin questing in April, peaking between May to July, and declining around August. Lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) are active in April, peak between May to July and then suddenly slow at the end of July over much of their range.

Tick populations, and tick-borne diseases are spreading northward across the US, Canada and the UK. Scientists believe the expansion is related to changes in climate, and host population growth including deer and mice.

Tips to Avoid Questing Ticks
  1. Wear long sleeves and long pants tucked into socks.
  2. Avoid high-risk areas, especially forest edges, tall grass and weedy forest understory.
  3. Thoroughly check for ticks after time spent outdoors.
  4. Make your yard less tick friendly by mowing your lawn frequently, removing leaf litter and brush, storing wood piles away from your home and keeping pets away from heavily infested areas.
What to do if you find a tick?
  1. Carefully remove the tick with tweezers.
  2. Preserve the tick so it can be identified and tested if necessary.
  3. If you identify a blacklegged tick (Ioxodes scapularis), submit it to a lab to test it for pathogens.
  4. Visit your doctor to get tested for tick-borne diseases, especially if you think a tick was allowed to feed for more than 24 hours, a requirement for transmission of some pathogens.
  5. Send a picture to TickSpotters. Tick experts the University of Rhode Island will return an identification in exchange for the location information, which allows them to track distribution and incidence data nationally.
Other Resources
TickEncounter, funded and managed by the University of Rhode Island Center for Vector-Borne Disease, is a comprehensive, user-friendly resource for managing ticks across the US. Information is seasonally and regionally relevant, important because ticks behave differently in different parts of the US. The tick identification webpage ranks the most common ticks in a region and describes seasonal activities, diseases vectored, and pictures engorged ticks which can look quite different from their unfed state.
   
The Public/Private Tick IPM Working Group was launched last October, amid rising concerns over the spread of ticks and tick-borne diseases. More than fifty individuals from federal, state and local governments, Land Grant Universities, non-governmental organizations and others participate in this forum for communication, networking and collaboration. The Working Group hosts conference calls on the second Wednesday of each month and maintains a listserv. The group is currently completing a priority ranking survey before it moves forward with concrete projects and deliverables. If you are interested in learning more about the Group, contact Jane Petzoldt. The Group is funded by a grant from the USDA North Central IPM Working Group.

The Pest Management Strategic Plan posted at  School IPM 2015 also includes a section on ticks, including best practices for tick management on school grounds.
School IPM 2015 Updated Priorities
The goal of the School IPM 2015 Strategic Plan is to assess the current status of pest management in our school systems, identify priorities for management, education, research and regulation, compile our current understanding of best practices and set out a plan of action to achieve full implementation of IPM in all of our schools by 2015. The first plan was released in 2009.

Strategic plan priorities were recently updated through a ranking survey completed by all four regional School IPM working groups (Northeastern, North Central , Western and Southern). Priorities were ranked according to the number of votes each priority received during the ranking process, 51 working group members voted. The updated strategic plan will be available at the School IPM 2015 website later this year. Below are the top five ranked priorities for each section.

Management Priorities
  1. Track adoption of IPM practices in schools and disseminate economic, environmental and/or health impacts of IPM. Educate policy makers about the needs and benefits of IPM in terms of dollars, health, environmental and academic performance.
  2. Identify and piggyback with ongoing environmental health efforts and coordinate with partners in promoting IPM to help schools and child care facilities to meet healthy, high performance and safety, economic and energy efficiency goals.
  3. Create job-specific IPM guidelines for roles within schools.
  4. Develop IPM decision-making tools.
  5. Identify, educate and activate appropriate school-related organizations to embed IPM into the organizational culture.
Regulatory Priorities
  1. Establish IPM policies in school systems to institutionalize the commitment to IPM.
  2. Identify and promote interagency cooperation among regulatory, environmental, health, insurance, education, State and Federal, Cooperative Extension and other agencies.
  3. Create and mandate minimum standards for school IPM at federal level established through high level IPM training/licensing for pest management professionals.
  4. Implement and enforce existing IPM laws and policies at the highest level of economic and regulatory accountability.
  5. Work to incorporate IPM strategies into building codes.
Research Priorities
  1. Identify effective least-risk products and tools to manage pests and measure IPM continual improvement.
  2. Research the cost of IPM, including: implementation and education versus conventional pest management. Conduct a cost analysis for misapplication of pesticides (indoor and outdoor), calculate the cost savings of exclusion practices, research effectiveness of pesticides/pest treatments.
  3. Research the impact IPM has on indoor and outdoor school environmental health, e.g., school well water, school gardens, use of adjacent properties, children's health, (asthma, allergies, absenteeism, grades, ADHA), academic performance and safety factors.
  4. Research and evaluate outreach methods to determine most effective methods of school/community audiences.
  5. Evaluate building design, construction, renovation, and maintenance criteria.
Education Priorities
  1. Develop and utilize educational methods to provide education and hands-on training for custodial, maintenance, kitchen and grounds staff, school nurses, facility directors, administrators, teachers and IPM coordinators.
  2. Partner with pest management professionals (PMPs) and organizations to create and implement effective, economical IPM service relationships.
  3. Create best management practice for schools to use with vendors of pest management services, design and construction services, custodial services, food and drink product service providers, etc.
  4. Improve superintendents, principals and teacher pre-service training courses and develop curricula for training Extension, state legislators and other change agents.
  5. Create multi-state coordinated train the trainer programs on School IPM, e.g., resources for peer-to-peer training.
Several Current Projects Addressing Priorities 
The North Central School IPM Working Group, the University of Arizona and other individuals from federal, state and local governments, Cooperative Extension, non-governmental and non-profit organizations are currently working on Stop School Pests - A National Standard IPM Training Program. This project addresses the priority for educational, hands-on training for school staff roles and is funded by the North Central IPM Center and the Environmental Protection Agency. To learn more about the Stop School Pests training program, check out the  March School IPM 2015 eNewsletter article.

Texas A&M University, Salt Lake City School District and Colorado State University are currently addressing the priority to develop IPM decision-making tools through their work on iPEST, SchoolDude and the IPM Calculator, funded by the Environmental Protection Agency. The North Central School IPM Working Group is currently developing the Illinois IPM Association, which addresses the priority to identify, educate and activate appropriate school-related organizations to embed IPM into the organizational culture, funded by the North Central IPM Center.

Northeastern IPM Center funded Expanding School IPM Implementation within the Northeastern United States: a Best Management Practices (BMP) Approach, addressing the priority to provide succinct guidance documents and training aid for practitioners to use with vendors of pest management services, design and construction services, custodial services, food and drink product service providers and other vendors. To learn more about this project, check out the article below.  

The regional working groups continue to address the priority to identify and promote interagency cooperation among regulatory, environmental, health, insurance, education, State and Federal, Cooperative Extension and other agencies.
Best Management Practices for School IPM  
In 2013 the Northeastern IPM Center funded Expanding School IPM Implementation within the Northeastern United States: a Best Management Practices (BMP) Approach, led by Lynn Braband of Cornell University. This project evaluated, incorporated, and augmented existing resources in the development of a school IPM best management practices (BMP) website. They piloted the website in train-the-trainer events in three states and systematically evaluated the website through surveys, focus groups, and training events.

The project has led to improved resources and training which should increase the number of schools practicing high-level IPM, thereby safeguarding human health and the environment. The resources created are available on the website. 

Topics include:
  • IPM basics, why is IPM so important to schools?
  • How can your school benefit from using IPM?
  • Use of pesticides on school property
  • IPM policies and protocols
  • Common IPM terms
  • Pesticide use and IPM laws by states in the Northeast
  • IPM websites and other resources
Site-specific practices address both indoor and outdoor areas: cafeterias, kitchens, storage areas, classrooms, offices, staff lounges, hallways, locker rooms, gyms, pools, mechanical rooms, crawlspaces, walls, windows, roofs, eaves, athletic fields, fence lines, parking lots and sidewalks, low-maintenance turf and planting beds and gardens.

The project team encourages schools to utilize pest prevention and pest monitoring tools to reduce reliance on pesticides and to select least-risk control methods to minimize risks of human exposure to pests and pesticides.